Eamonn Lynskey's Poetry and Reading Blog

February 8, 2017

Publication in Flare 02, Jan. 2017

flare-02

Very much indebted to the Sunflower Sessions (which are held in Jack Nealon’s Public House, Capel Street, Dublin, every last Wednesday) for including me again in their FLARE publication. The editor, Eamon Mag Uidhir, has declared it will be issued four times a year and we have all learned that Eamon is a man of his word. A bright, spacious, sparkling offering, this: 33 p0ems from 33 participants in the monthly sessions, some well known, others new on the scene, all worth a look.

I particularly liked Anamaria Crowe Serrano’s ‘Apple – 7’, with its unusual and very original lay-out. Anamaria’s innovations are impossible for me to quote on the page so you will have lay hands on a FLARE02 to appreciate how near the cutting edge of experimental poetry she is. Alice Kinsella’s short and economic piece ‘Starlight’ concerns the necessary slaughter that lies behind our veal dishes:

In late summer almost winter  

they’d lock the cows up for the day                                                                                

to take away their young …

and Anne Tannam’s ‘When We Go Shopping’ is also one of my favourites. It’s that kind of ‘domestic’ poem she always does very well, this one concerning the relationship between an elderly mother and her daughter.

When we go shopping, just the two of us

I get to be the child again, out with my mam for the day…

Writing a poem is never easy (well, Shakespeare maybe …) and writing a an optimistic, upbeat one I have always found particularly difficult, and so I admire Liz McSkeane’s ‘Remembering the Child’ . Liz is a long-time friend but that won’t prevent me declaring her poem a very fine piece of work. One feels BETTER about the world after reading it. And those awful things that you fear might be coming your way? —

… and just between

us — that won’t happen. Now, the sun is bright,

please step aside. You’re standing in my light.

So many good poems. A flash-back to times of church oppression in Ireland from Ross Hattaway and a curious, disturbing poem ‘Eve’ from Natasha Helen Crudden which weighs out its words and lines carefully.

My own offering is a rather nostalgic piece which harkens back to the time one could see the Guinness barges on the Liffey. The poem tries to merge those long-forgotten scenes of the past with the present haulage system of container transport by imagining a meeting between the present day drivers and the ‘bargeymen’ of old.

The Liffey at Low Tide

The Liffey at low tide

this evening at Kingsbridge

reveals the ghosts of jetties

built for barges bringing

Guinness down to port.

 –

Jib cranes swing and strain,

men work with ropes and winches,

loading wooden barrels

into swaying holds

and friendly banter drifts

along Victoria Quay

where juggernauts line up

and drivers sleep alone

and wander in their dreams

down to the bargemen, talk

till morning when they yawn,

climb from their cabins, peer

across the parapet

at faint remains of timbers

drowned in rising waters.

If you wish to enter some work for the next Flare the only requirement (apart from 20170208_095250_NEW.jpg quality, of course!) is that you must have read out something (prose or poetry) at the sessions. So come along some evening at 7.30 pm and join our merry throng, at the Sunflower Sessions, every last Wednesday of the month, except December, at Jack Nealon’s Public House, Capel Street, Dublin (7.30 pm), and get your name on the evening’s reading list.

FLARE02 is available for €5 at the sessions and also at Books Upstairs and the Winding Stair bookshops.  The cover shows a detail of Eddie Colla street art, Capel Street, photographed by Declan McLoughlin (our genial open-mike MC). For more information, join online at meetup.com or email sunflower_sessions@yahoo.com. Also on Facebook.

Nealon's Pub, Capel Street

Nealon’s Pub, Capel Street

See You soon!

August 30, 2015

The Sunflower Sessions 26 August @ Jack Nealons in Capel Street

Filed under: Readings, The Sunflower Sessions — Tags: , , — tvivf @ 2:25

The featured writer at the Sunflower Sessions this month was Liz McSkeane,

Liz McSkeane
Liz McSkeane

a published and award-winning poet (The Hennessy) who read some new work and some ‘older’ work from her collection ‘Snow at the Opera House’ (published by New Island). Her poem ‘Plea Bargain’ (from that aforementioned collection) is a very impressive piece on the vulnerability of civilians in time of war. It is a poem that, once heard or read, tends to stay in the mind and somehow recalls to me the graphic reporting of great women war correspondents like Adie Roche and Lyse Doucet. This poem, and many more, provided us with a great listening experience for our August session.

Also adding to the experience were a number of NEW FACES, like Eamon Maguire with his acerbic writings on suburbia, and a poem entitled ‘Swaps’ which proved that one can write poetry about stamp-collecting (a poem that brought me back to my early youth … about 200 years ago …).  Mandy (no second name given) and Pat (whose second name I can’t remember) provided some entertaining poems on sport and Kenneth Nolan gave a hilarious prose-poem account of his trying to walk down Dame Street against the tide of Spanish tourists, beggars and chuggers. Strictly non-PC stuff from Kenneth which was surprisingly refreshing. More good stuff from Pauline Mullally, Jim Hynes and several more newcomers, whose names I did not get, so slow am I. It is really great to see the Sunflower Sessions expanding into new territories and attracting new voices.

Of course the ‘old comers’  (like myself) were much in evidence too… and where would we be without them? [please note that this is a rhetorical question only].

Again, everyone was indebted to the usual suave handling of the event by MC Declan McLoughlin.

June 26, 2015

The Sunflower Sessions in Nealon’s of Capel Street, Wed.24 June 2015

Filed under: The Sunflower Sessions — tvivf @ 2:25

The Sunflower Sessions in Nealon’s Pub are well and truly on the road now since they first began a few

Nealon's Pub, Capel Street
Nealon’s Pub, Capel Street

short months ago. Those veterans of the ‘Last Wednesday’ open mic in The Twisted Pepper  in Abbey Street will know that this is the re-branded, new-located version of that long-running event. Nealon’s  Pub at the bridge end of Capel Street is a very attractive venue and the starting time is still 7.30pm, so you can get out early enough for that late bus. Another bonus, besides the great poetry and prose on display, is that we still have the inimitable Declan McLoughlin to steer the ship and keep manners on over-enthusiastic scribes.

Anamaria closeLast week (24 June) the featured writer was Anamaria Crowe-Serrano (left), who gave a rich sampling of her poetry from her collection ‘Femispheres’ (Shearsman Books, 2008), including the poem ‘Breadmaking’ which I have always liked for its simplicity and depth. She also read some of her more recent work. Anamaria is a translator and her poetry very often reflects that analysis of language as language that often appears in the work of poets fluent in a number of tongues. A truly professional and dedicated writer who weighs her words carefully.

Also on the programme were some of the usual suspect (myself, Ross Hattaway, Roger Hudson, Anne Tannam and Philip Lynch (to name but a few) and Daniel Wade, a relative newcomer, who produced some of the very best poems I’ve heard in a while. Two of them were based around Dunlaoighre and Howth E Keane bluedressand  were really very fine. I heard that he was placed in the Henessy Awards and I am not surprised. An honorable mention also must go to Eileen Keane (right) who read part of a story entitled ‘Snap! , which can be heard on the website Longstoryshort.

There were some other writers with really good work but I can’t remember their names. It’s no accident that one of the poems I read out was entitled ‘Old Guy’. Slightly autobiographical …

Blog at WordPress.com.

%d bloggers like this: